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Mango Lemon Ice Cream

March 18, 2018 1 Comment

Mango Lemon Ice Cream

 

It's the end of mango season- the best time to buy up these delicious fruits! Right now, mangoes are at their ripest, sweetest, most fragrant point- and I will be buying them up by the crateful. In my experience, mangoes are one of the best fruits to help you lose weight fast- and stay slim all season! They're amazing fruits to infuse into your teas- they boost your beverages with potent anti-aging benefits that help you look and feel younger, longer. And with our amazing selection of antioxidant-rich herbal blends, like Happy Place, you're basically drinking straight from the fountain of youth! 

But in case you are wondering what do I do with so many mangoes (other than eat them five at a time), I have the most amazing recipe for you today: (raw, vegan) mango lemon ice cream! This recipe is creamy, exotic, fragrant, and tastes divine. Plus, it’s loaded with antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds. You'll practically be eating your way to younger skin! Let’s get started.

You will need:

1 cup soaked Cashews

1 cup Young Coconut Meat (Asian markets sell crates of coconuts at inexpensive prices)

½ cup Happy Place tea (try cold-brewing this in the coconut water) OR fresh Coconut Water

1 cup fresh Mango Pulp

3 tbsp. Vanilla Extract

¼ tsp. Sea Salt

½ cup Coconut Oil, melted

1-2 drops Lemon Essential Oil

Optional: Coconut nectar, to taste 

Love fruit? Also try Power Berry Granola.

In a high-speed blender, add all ingredients except the coconut oil, beginning with the liquids and building up to the solids. Blend until smooth, while breaking periodically to avoid overheating. Then turn the blender on low and stream the coconut oil into the mixture as the blender runs.

Once smooth, pour the mixture into an ice cream maker (if you have one) and follow the manufacturer’s instructions, or transfer the mixture to the refrigerator to set initially. Once it is relatively solid, move it to the freezer in a sealed container. This way, you get fewer ice crystals. Once it is frozen, if you notice that there are ice crystals, you can break them up in a food processor to smooth out the ice cream before transferring back to the freezer.

It’s ready to be enjoyed! Try it out and let us know what you think. Happy munching!




1 Response

Gail
Gail

August 12, 2018

Such a delightful read about such a delightful treat…

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